Cover of: Rereading the Rabbis | Judith Hauptman

Rereading the Rabbis

A Woman"s Voice (Radical Traditions)
  • 300 Pages
  • 2.43 MB
  • 485 Downloads
  • English
by
Westview Press
Gender studies, Jewish studies, Judaism, Theology, Sociology, Religion, Judaism - Talmud, Women"s Studies - General, History and criticism, Religion-Judaism - Talmud, Social Science / Women"s Studies, Judaism - Ge
The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL8023835M
ISBN 100813334063
ISBN 139780813334066

Rereading The Rabbis: A Woman's Voice and millions of other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - Cited by: Hauptman's thesis is that the Rabbis of the Talmud sought to improve the legal status of Jewish women beyond what Biblical law originally accorded women.

In support of her thesis, Hauptman shows the evolution of legal theory and practice pertaining to women through the Talmudic period. The book is gracefully written and carefully argued/5(6). *The Torah is a bit fuzzy on the distinction between rape and seduction, instituting a uniform penalty for both; the rabbis added additional fines for rape.

*The Torah This book explains how rabbinic tradition gradually moved towards a more pro-woman posture in several ways.4/5. The NOOK Book (eBook) of the Rereading The Rabbis: A Woman's Voice by Judith Hauptman at Barnes & Noble.

FREE Shipping on $35 or more. Due to COVID, orders may be delayed. Thank you for your : Judith Rereading the Rabbis book. 1st Edition Published on Decem by Routledge Fully acknowledging that Judaism, as described in both the Bible and the Talmud, was patriarchal, Judith Rereading The Rabbis: A Woman's Voice - 1st Edition - Judith Hauptman Garland Science Website Announcement.

Rereading the Rabbis: A Woman's Voice also breaks new ground methodologically. Rather than plucking passages from a variety of different rabbinical works and then sewing them together to produce a single, unified rabbinical point of view, Hauptman reads sources in their own literary and legal context and then considers them in relationship to a rich array of associated synchronic and diachronic materials.

texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK (US) Rereading the Rabbis book Lincoln Collection. Rereading the rabbis by Judith Hauptman. Publication date Topics Talmud -- Criticism, interpretation, etc, Talmud -- Feminist criticism, Women in rabbinical literaturePages: The rabbis had for their base text the verses in Deuteronomy –4, which state that if a man takes a wife and then finds something unseemly in her, he may write her a bill of divorce, put it in her hand, and send her out of his house.

Nowhere does this suggest that the woman has any agency or decision-making power to either initiate or resist. Divinations: Rereading Late Ancient Religion Description: When the rabbis composed the Mishnah in the late second or early third century C.E., the Jerusalem Temple had been destroyed for more then a century.

Description Rereading the Rabbis FB2

Why, then, do the Temple and its ritual feature so prominently in the Mishnah. The Mystery Rabbi Small Series Books. Harry Kemelman began writing these mystery series of books in and his first publication was the book under the title Friday the Rabbi Slept Late’, which was a book about religious mystery.

It soom became a bestseller and Kemelman won his first novel inthe Edgar Award and he was very proud of it. It shows how the father transgresses halakhah on several occasions and that his sentence over the son is illegitimate.

Additionally, by pointing out the connection of Kafka’s narrative to rabbinic law, this essay highlights its midrashic, i.e. commentary character and relates it to the biblical story of Jacob and Esau in the Book of Genesis.

The Memory of the Temple and the Making of the Rabbis. Divinations: rereading late ancient religion. Naftali S. Cohn There is a great deal to appreciate in this very well researched and crafted book.

The work is strongest in its isolation of discourse about the Temple as a key shaper and marker of identity and authority for a variety of Author: Phillip Michael Sherman. Although some of these developments may have originated in the surrounding Greco-Roman culture, the rabbis freely chose to incorporate them into Jewish ing the Rabbis: A Woman's Voice also breaks new ground : Westview Press.

Rereading Hagar. Some want to read Hagar back into the story, giving her character new subtleties and possibilities. What encourages me is that some rabbis want to read Hagar back into the story and give her character new subtleties and possibilities. Five books of story, law, and poetry divided into 54 weekly portions.

Bible. Kohelet. The Memory of the Temple and the Making of the Rabbis (Divinations: Rereading Late Ancient Religion) View larger image. Naftali S. Cohn argues that the memory of the Temple served a political function for the rabbis in their own time.

They described the Temple and its ritual in a unique way that helped to establish their authority within. re-reading the rabbis, rewriting scripture: three theoretical approaches to midrash and literature re-reading the rabbis, rewriting scripture: three theoretical approaches to midrash and literature wright, terence review essay r e -r eadi ng the r abbi s, r ewritin g s criptu re: t hre e t h eoretical a pproache s to m i dras h and l ite ratu re t ere nce r.

w right. Rereading The Rabbis: A Woman's Voice (Radical Traditions) Deeper Voice: Get a Deeper voice Quickly, Become a Leader: Proven way to deepen your voice:(Low pitched voice, Attractive Voice, Voice Singers, Manly Voice, Charisma, Power) Qur'an and Woman: Rereading the Sacred TextFile Size: KB.

Rereading the Rabbis: Woman’s Voice. Westview Press, Boulder, CO, An ordained rabbi, Judith Hauptman is E. Billi Ivry Professor of Talmud and Rabbinics at the. Judith Hauptman, Rereading the Rabbis. Paula Hyman and Deborah Dash Moore, Women in America Judith A.

Kates and Gail Twersky Reimer (eds.), Best Contemporary Jewish Books.

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I went tonight with my mother to a book discussion at her discussion focused on Douglas Rushkoff's Nothing Sacred, which I read when it first came out but hadn’t opened in a rereading it, I noticed even more strongly what I like about the book, and also what I dislike.

Rereading the Rabbis Stroum Center for Jewish Studies T Specific Learning Objectives for Reading the Rabbis. Stroum Center for Jewish Studies, The Henry M.

Jackson School of International Studies, University of Washington, BoxSeattle, WA   Rereading The Rabbis: A Woman’s Voice by Judith Hauptman. Buy this book at Amazon and on Kindle.

Fully acknowledging that Judaism, as described in both the Bible and the Talmud, was patriarchal, Judith Hauptman demonstrates that the rabbis of the Talmud made significant changes in key areas of Jewish law in order to benefit women. Reading.

Rereading The Rabbis: A Woman's Voice (Radical Traditions S) Fully acknowledging that Judaism, as described in both the Bible and the Talmud, was patriarchal, Judith Hauptman demonstrates that the rabbis of the Talmud made significant changes in key areasFile Size: KB.

Rereading the Rabbis: A Woman’s Voice. Boulder CO: This book offers a consciously feminist reading of most of the major rabbinic texts dealing with women’s position within Judaism. Hauptman, Judith.

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“Mishnah Gittin as a Pietist Document” (Hebrew). Rereading the Rabbis: A Woman's Voice by Judith Hauptman starting at $ Rereading the Rabbis: A Woman's Voice has 2 available editions to buy at Half Price Books Marketplace.

Get this from a library. Rereading the rabbis: a woman's voice. [Judith Hauptman] -- "Fully acknowledging that Judaism, as described in both the Bible and the Talmud, was patriarchal, Judith Hauptman demonstrates that the rabbis of the Talmud made significant changes in key areas of.

A stunning achievement. You will not be able to put this book down, and may even find yourself rushing off to study TalmudJudith Hauptman, Professor of Talmud and Rabbinic Culture, Jewish Theological Seminary; author of Rereading the Rabbis, A Woman’s Voice.

Book II MIRIAM - The engrossing historical series continues. Legal Stories (Divinations: Rereading Late Ancient Religion) Aphrodite and the Rabbis: How the Jews Adapted Roman Culture to Create Judaism as We Know It The Ordination of Women as Rabbis: Studies and Responsa (Moreshet) Holy Serpent of the Jews: The Rabbis' Secret Plan for.

Professor Rabbi Judith Hauptman is the E. Billi Ivry Professor of Talmud and Rabbinic Culture at JTS and a fellow of the American Academy of Jewish Research. She holds a Ph.D. in Talmud from JTS and rabbinic ordination from the Academy for Jewish Religion.

Among her books are Rereading the Rabbis: A Woman’s Voice, Development of the Talmudic Sugya: Relationship between Tannaitic and Amoraic. Rereading the Rabbis: A Woman's Voice also breaks new ground methodologically. Rather than plucking passages from a variety of different rabbinical works and then sewing them together to produce a single, unified rabbinical point of view, Hauptman reads sources in their own literary and legal context and then considers them in relationship to a.

There's a good quip about the Jewish people: we're the longest running book club on the planet. This week, in synagogues and study halls across the world, Jews are rolling the scroll of the Torah back to the beginning and starting again. This is a different kind .A Guide to Jewish Religious Practice, Isaac Klein (New York: JTS) ISBN A liberal outline of daily and holiday practices.

The Sacred Cluster, Rabbi Ismar Schorsch. A concise statement of the essence of Conservative Judaism. Rereading the Rabbis: A Woman's Voice, Judith Hauptman (Westbrook Press) ISBN Judith Hauptman's Rereading the Rabbis: A Woman's Voice is a different kind of feminist book on the Talmud from any that has been written until today.

It is written from the perspective of a female scholar who is completely devoted, herself, to the continuation of the practice of traditional Judaism (what might even be called "Orthodox" Judaism, were that not such a misnomer in general).